T.

wnderlst:

Cochem, Germany | Ryan Wyckoff


Protip: If you are an RPH, RPT, or any other blog that offers any services in the roleplaying community, please make your What I Do page as easy to find as possible. This lowers both the time people have to spend searching for your services offers and the probability that someone might ask for something you don’t do.

09-20 / 1:55

izuruskira:

I


09-20 / 1:48 / 3 notes / izuruskira

winterlocked is becoming something of a para rp and I don’t know if I can handle this kind of responsibility??

09-20 / 1:48

wocinsolidarity:

feministplayground:

Shortfilm about a deaf, black girl who dreams of being a dancer

!

ultrafacts:

jenniferrpovey:

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.

They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.

And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.

And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.

Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.

So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.

Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).

This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

Knowledge is power


greyliliy:

blue-author:

duskenpath:

oli-via:

duskenpath:

Rest stops on highways are liminal spaces where the veil is thin and nobody can tell me differently

Explain

The explanation is that liminal spaces are in between places that bridge Here with There, so in fairy tales we often have the Fairy Ring, the Forest Clearing, the Sudden Misty Foggy Forest, the Bridge, the River, graveyards, in some cases

We also have a ton of american urban mythology around famous roadways and sites off the sides of roads

Archetypes like these occur to mark the places in the world where the veil goes thin and humans can have extra-worldly experiences, out of the ordinary way of living

So why wouldn’t transient spaces like rest stops where everyone is just passing through from one place to the next, never stopping for too long, not be a liminal space where spirits frequent, too

Especially since nobody would know if they were real or not

This is how I feel about airports. I hate going through security, but once I’m in, I’m nowhere and everywhere. Neither here nor there.

Hotel California

nomadic-thoughts:

affectedline:

hellbunnyshutch:

Reblogging because this actually is a thing that should concern more people. 

^^^^

SAVE THE BEES

If we ever meet again…

Graphic for Winterlocked.


09-19 / 19:03 / 5 notes